W Vasey and Sons Timeline

Follow the History Timeline for W Vasey & Sons alongside the Furniture Movements and Styles they have experienced.

1890

1890

1890 – The Beginning   The Carlisle Artists Academy, Frith Street in front of Castle, was where William Vasey, Auctioneer, began his business in 1890. Unfortunately this historic building was demolished in 1929.

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1910 Arts & Crafts Movement

1910 Arts & Crafts Movement

Arts and crafts (c.1860 to 1910) The arts and crafts movement was made up of English designers and writers who wanted a return to well-made, handcrafted goods instead of mass-produced, poor quality machine-made items. Style handmade simple forms with little ornamentation beauty of natural materials copper and pewter – often with a hammered finish stylised flowers, allegories from the Bible and literature, upside down hearts, Celtic motifs

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1910 Fisher Street

1910 Fisher Street

Firm moves to new premises at the top end of Fisher Street behind historic Town Hall and near Cathedral, began dealing in new furniture alongside Auctioneering. Every week the new furniture on display needed to be moved and piled up in window to create space for the buyers attending the Auction!

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1914 Art Nouveau Movement

1914 Art Nouveau Movement

Art nouveau (c.1890 to 1914) Art nouveau could be said to be the first 20th century modern style. It was the first style to stop looking backwards in history for ideas, taking inspiration instead from what it saw around it, in particular the natural world. Style sinuous, elongated, curvy lines the whiplash line vertical lines and height stylised flowers, leaves, roots, buds and seedpods the female form – in a pre-Raphaelite pose with long, flowing hair exotic woods, marquetry, iridescent glass, silver and semi-precious stones

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1920 Scotch Street

1920 Scotch Street

A few years later and the Firm has moved to 50 – 52 Scotch Street where they had a long narrow shop with a high ceiling and a seperate auction room to the rear.

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1919 – 1933 Bauhaus Movement

1919 – 1933 Bauhaus Movement

Bauhaus  (c.1919 to 1933) The Bauhaus was a school whose approach to design and the combination of fine art and arts and crafts proved to be a major influence on the development of graphic design as well as much of 20th century modern art.

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1935 Great Dockray, Penrith

1935 Great Dockray, Penrith

In 1935 W. Vasey and Sons expended and opened its first branch in Great Dockray, Penrith.

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1903 – 1935 Art Deco

1903 – 1935 Art Deco

Was not just for the elite. By the 1930s, mass production meant that everyone could live in the deco style. Travel became popular. African safaris were all the rage and animal skins, ivory, mother of pearl, and tortoiseshell began to appear in the home. After Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered, Egyptian pyramids and sphinxes adorned everything. Style geometric and angular shapes chrome, glass, shiny fabrics, mirrors and mirror tiles stylised images of aeroplanes, cars, cruise liners, skyscrapers nature motifs – shells, sunrises, flowers theatrical contrasts – highly polished wood and glossy black lacquer mixed with satin and furs

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1939 – Who Knew

1939 – Who Knew

Things slowly got better following the 1929 Stock Market Crash and the subsequent worldwide Depression. For 5 shillings a week you could now afford a Walnut Bedroom Suite. This receipt is from 1939, lets hope all survived the Second World War.

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1942 – 1952 Utility Furniture

1942 – 1952 Utility Furniture

Utility furniture refers to furniture produced in the United Kingdom during and just after World War II, under a Government scheme which was designed to cope with shortages of raw materials and rationing of consumption. Introduced in 1942, the Utility Furniture Scheme continued into post-war austerity and lasted until 1952. The range of new furniture available was restricted with a choice of two designs for upholstry and two bedroom designs. Often Sales were decided by drawing names out of a hat.

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1948 – Whittles, Whitehaven

1948 – Whittles, Whitehaven

A few years after the end of the end of WW2, W Vasey and Sons took over Whittles in Whitehaven.

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1955 – 1970 Modernism/Mid-Century

1955 – 1970 Modernism/Mid-Century

Modernism is more a way of thinking than a style. Modernists believed that the design of an object should be based purely on its purpose – that ‘form follows function’. Style under-furnished, austere spaces use of tubular steel, plastic, laminated plywood, fibreglass abstract motifs bold primary colours

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1969 – Blue Bell, Scotch Street

1969 – Blue Bell, Scotch Street

As business prospered Scotch Street Carlisle began to grow, first upwards with the addition of an extra floor, then outwards with the aquisition of adjoining properties. The company then purchased a state managed public house called The Blue Bell, an old coaching Inn with a fine minstrel gallery.

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2010 – Contemporary Furniture- Movement

2010 – Contemporary Furniture- Movement

Contemporary style encompasses a range of styles developed in the latter half of the 20th century. Pieces feature softened and rounded lines as opposed to the stark lines seen in modern design. Interiors contain neutral elements and bold color, and they focus on the basics of line, shape and form.

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2017 – Refurbishment and Re-launch

2017 – Refurbishment and Re-launch

Following disasterous flooding in 2016 Vasey’s Style Store, now situated at Lancaster Street Carlisle, has undergone an extensive refurbishment and has re-opened.

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